Date Added : 2011-05-10 14:19:43

Guhyasamaja

Code TON-7784
Weight 2600 Grams
Size 24cm
Availablity Subject to Avilability
Minimum Qty 1
Price 500 SGD
Note : * Shipping Cost will be provided upon Enquiry..
Quantity
Related Information
 
buy now with PayPal
Quick Enquiry

About Guhyasamaja

The Guhyasamāja Tantra is one of the most important scriptures of esoteric Buddhism. In its fullest form it consists of seventeen chapters though a separate "explanatory tantra" known as the Appendix Tantra (uttaratantra) is sometimes considered to be its eighteenth chapter. Many scholars believe that the original core of the work consisted of the first twelve chapters with chapters thirteen to seventeen being added later as explanatory material.

In India, it was classified as a Yoga or Mahāyoga Tantra. In Tibet it is considered an Unexcelled Yoga Tantra . It develops traditions found in earlier scriptures such as the Sarva-tathāgata-tattva-saṃgraha but is focused to a greater extent on the antinomian aspects characteristic of the later Buddhist Tantras. It survives in Sanskrit manuscripts and in Tibetan and Chinese translation.


We have a huge collection of Nepali handmade statues in this category. These statues are made up of copper, brass or bronze and are finished in various styles like gold plating, partly gold plating, oxidized or bronze finishing. The majority of the statues you see with us are handmade by the process of loss wax system, which is considered to be the ancient process of making the statue in Nepal.

Brief Introduction

The Guhyasamāja Tantra (Sanskrit; Scripture of the Esoteric Community) is one of the most important scriptures of esoteric Buddhism. In its fullest form, it consists of seventeen chapters, though a separate "explanatory tantra" known as the Appendix Tantra (uttaratantra) is sometimes considered to be its eighteenth chapter. Many scholars believe that the original core of the work consisted of the first twelve chapters, with chapters thirteen to seventeen being added later as explanatory material.

In India, it was classified as a Yoga or Mahāyoga Tantra. In Tibet it is considered an Unexcelled Yoga Tantra (rnal 'byor bla med rgyud). It develops traditions found in earlier scriptures such as the Sarva-tathāgata-tattva-saṃgraha but is focused to a greater extent on the antinomian aspects characteristic of the later Buddhist Tantras. It survives in Sanskrit manuscripts and in Tibetan and Chinese translation.

Iconography

In the practice of the Noble Tradition, the central deity of the Guhyasamāja is blue-black Akshobhyavajra, a form of Akshobhya, one of the five transcendent lords (pa˝catathāgata). Akshobhyavajra holds a vajra and bell (ghanta) in his first two hands, and other hands hold the symbols of the four other transcendent lords: wheel of Vairocana and lotus of Amitabha in his rights, and gem of Ratnasambhava and sword of Amoghasiddhi in his lefts. The maṇḍala consists of thirty-two deities in all.

In the Jnanapada Tradition, the central deity is yellow Manjuvajra, a form of Manjushri. The deity has three faces - the right one is white and red one on the left - and six arms. The three faces may represent the three main channels of the subtle body, the three stages of purification of the mind or the illusory body, light, and their union.[1] Manjuvajra holds in his hands a sword and a book, and two of his other hand a bow and arrow represent liberative technique (upāya).

Origin

According to one tradition, the Guhyasamāja Tantra was taught for the first time by the Buddha in the form of Vajradhara to Indrabhuti the King of Oddiyana, also called King Dza.

As with most Tantras, there are different traditions and transmissions. Perhaps the oldest surviving lineage is the J˝ānapada Tradition (ye shes zhabs lugs), which goes back to Buddhaśrij˝āna (late 8th century). The most important historically is the Noble Tradition (gsang 'dus 'phags lugs) which is based on commentaries attributed to Nāgārjuna, Āryadeva and Candrakīrti. 'Gos Lotsawa Khug pa lhas btsas originated a transmission in Tibet, as did Marpa. The Sakya tradition received both transmissions. Tsongkhapa, founder of the Gelugpa, considered the Esoteric Community to be the most important of the Tantras and used the Noble Tradition as a template for interpreting all the other Tantric traditions.





Related Products