Date Added : 2009-12-28 12:06:48

Citipati

Code TON-4208
Weight 2000 Grams
Size 38cm
Availablity Available
Minimum Qty 1
Price 360 SGD
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About Citipati

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Citipati or Lords of the Cemetery are two mythological Buddhist ascetics who were so deep in their meditation, they were caught unawared by a thief and beheaded even before they knew they were dead. As a symbol, the Chittipati represent the eternal dance of death and perfect awareness. They are usually depicted as a male/female pair of intertwined skeletons caught up in an ecstatic dance. The dance of the Citipati is commemorated twice annually in Tibet with ritual dances. The Citipati are invoked as 'wrathful deities,' benevolent protectors who appear as fierce beings with a demonic appearance.


We have a huge collection of Nepali handmade statues in this category. These statues are made up of copper, brass or bronze and are finished in various styles like gold plating, partly gold plating, oxidized or bronze finishing. The majority of the statues you see with us are handmade by the process of loss wax system, which is considered to be the ancient process of making the statue in Nepal.

Brief Introduction

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Citipati, or “Lords of the Cemetery” are two mythological Buddhist ascetics, who were so deep in their meditation, they were caught unawares by a thief and beheaded even before they knew they were dead. As ea symbol, the Chittipati represent the eternal dance of death, and perfect awareness. They are usually depicted as a male/female pair of intertwined skeletons caught up in an ecstatic dance. The dance of the Citipati is commemorated twice annually in Tibet with ritual dances. The Citipati are invoked as 'wrathful deities,'’ benevolent protectors who appear as fierce beings with a demonic appearance.

Iconography

The Citipati are two skeletons, one of a man and the other of a woman, represented with arms and legs interlaced, dancing the Tsam dance. They are considered to be masters of the cemetery. The Citipati are one of the seventy-five forms of Mahakala and are visible reminders of the impermanence of everything worldly. Their mouths are parted in a large grin, showing all their teeth. Each wears a long scarf. According to a Northern Buddhist legend, the Citipati were, in a former existence, two ascetics who were once lost in such deep meditation that they did not notice that a thief had cut off their heads and thrown them in the dust. Since that time they have been ferocious enemies of thieves, having vowed eternal vengeance. This legend is somewhat similar to that of Yama. In the cemetery, the Citipati are supposed to perform a skeleton ritual dance during which they blow the Tibetan long horns. In most monasteries the dance, symbolic of the cycle of life and death, is performed in the monastery cemetery once in summer and once in winter by monks wearing masks.





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